embed embed share link link
Embed This Video close
Share This Video close
bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark
Rate This Video embed
1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (No Ratings Yet)
Loading...
Tags For This Video tags
rate rate tags tags lights lights

Landscape Architecture Fuller lecture: Catherine Seavitt Nordenson

“Shifting Sands: Sedimentary Cycles for Jamaica Bay”

“Shifting Sands” is a framework for enhancing coastal resiliency at Jamaica Bay, New York, a location highly affected by the 2012 landfall of Hurricane Sandy. The proposal includes novel design strategies for marsh island restoration and enhanced sediment delivery, and merging ecosystem restoration with coastal storm risk management strategies for the Rockaway Peninsula and the back-bay communities. Assessing social, environmental, and infrastructural vulnerabilities, the plan embraces the vast scale and fetch dimension of Jamaica Bay and explores the role of natural and nature-based features within the urban context of this estuarine embayment.

Catherine Seavitt Nordenson is an associate professor at the City College of New York and principal of Catherine Seavitt Studio. Her research focuses on design adaptation to sea level rise in urban coastal environments and explores novel landscape restoration practices given the dynamics of climate change. Seavitt coauthored the book On the Water: Palisade Bay, a climate adaptation proposal for New York’s Upper Harbor; this study was the foundation of the 2010 exhibition “Rising Currents” at the Museum of Modern Art, New York. Seavitt is currently leading research at Jamaica Bay as part of Structures of Coastal Resilience, a project supported by the Rockefeller Foundation and the US Army Corps of Engineers.

This lecture has been reviewed and approved by the Oregon Chapter of American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) for 1.0 Health, Safety, and Welfare Professional Development Hours (PDH) for Oregon Registered Landscape Architects.

 

>